Category Archives: Ideas worth pondering

How Does She Do It? First hand stories and advice from successful female scientists with kids

The Fairhall lab at the University of Washington has compiled a fantastic (and growing) collection of first-hand accounts from female scientists who have successful scientific careers and families. Each woman tells her story and gives some key pieces of advice on

How Does She Do It? First hand stories and advice from successful female scientists with kids

The Fairhall lab at the University of Washington has compiled a fantastic (and growing) collection of first-hand accounts from female scientists who have successful scientific careers and families. Each woman tells her story and gives some key pieces of advice on

Have you heard about ‘The Journal of Brief Ideas’?

Thanks to postdoc Dominic Eberle from the BIOTEC for telling us about this new journal! “I just stumbled upon a new journal which fills quite an interesting niche: The Journal of Brief Ideas. http://beta.briefideas.org/about The lead article by David Harris describes very

Have you heard about ‘The Journal of Brief Ideas’?

Thanks to postdoc Dominic Eberle from the BIOTEC for telling us about this new journal! “I just stumbled upon a new journal which fills quite an interesting niche: The Journal of Brief Ideas. http://beta.briefideas.org/about The lead article by David Harris describes very

More articles on the postdoc experience, plus good news from the Max Planck Society

It’s time for another link roundup, because tons of great articles, reports, blog posts, and podcasts relevant to postdocs have come out in the past few months. The NatureJobs Blog has an ongoing “postdoc series” that started at the beginning

More articles on the postdoc experience, plus good news from the Max Planck Society

It’s time for another link roundup, because tons of great articles, reports, blog posts, and podcasts relevant to postdocs have come out in the past few months. The NatureJobs Blog has an ongoing “postdoc series” that started at the beginning

The Thrill of Defeat

Hi all! Just read an awesome article, The Thrill of Defeat < http://nautil.us/issue/21/information/the-thrill-of-defeat > The article unfolds what the author describes as the ‘biggest scoop’ of molecular biology – deciphering the genetic code. It is educational, suspenseful (?), and easy to read. The best

The Thrill of Defeat

Hi all! Just read an awesome article, The Thrill of Defeat < http://nautil.us/issue/21/information/the-thrill-of-defeat > The article unfolds what the author describes as the ‘biggest scoop’ of molecular biology – deciphering the genetic code. It is educational, suspenseful (?), and easy to read. The best

What is the future of scientific publishing and evaluation?

Publications are our primary scientific currency and play a major role in how we are evaluated when applying for jobs, tenure, and funding. Thus, the editorial, peer-review, and communication practices of major journals are important for all of us and

What is the future of scientific publishing and evaluation?

Publications are our primary scientific currency and play a major role in how we are evaluated when applying for jobs, tenure, and funding. Thus, the editorial, peer-review, and communication practices of major journals are important for all of us and

Share your vision for the future of science

Make your voice heard and share your vision for the future of science on the Future of Research page! They are collecting opinions about what would be the “ideal scientific enterprise”, and they will compile the responses to foster more

Share your vision for the future of science

Make your voice heard and share your vision for the future of science on the Future of Research page! They are collecting opinions about what would be the “ideal scientific enterprise”, and they will compile the responses to foster more

Image Image courtesy of Duncan Hall https://secure.flickr.com/photos/dullhunk/3986237289/

Continuing coverage of the Postdocalypse

It seems like every time you blink, someone is posting another article about the Postdocalypse to Facebook or Twitter (this includes us :)). I can’t decide if I feel totally depressed or a little bit encouraged that at least the plight

Image Image courtesy of Duncan Hall https://secure.flickr.com/photos/dullhunk/3986237289/

Continuing coverage of the Postdocalypse

It seems like every time you blink, someone is posting another article about the Postdocalypse to Facebook or Twitter (this includes us :)). I can’t decide if I feel totally depressed or a little bit encouraged that at least the plight

Postdocs: a shadow workforce?

An article was published on NPR.org this week focusing on the plight of postdocs trying to get jobs in academia: “Too Few University Jobs For America’s Young Scientists.” Have you read it? Here’s an excerpt: “By definition, a postdoc is

Postdocs: a shadow workforce?

An article was published on NPR.org this week focusing on the plight of postdocs trying to get jobs in academia: “Too Few University Jobs For America’s Young Scientists.” Have you read it? Here’s an excerpt: “By definition, a postdoc is

“Taking the right steps”

Hello group, Here’s an interesting article about the ‘right steps’ to take to become a successful group leader – check it out! “Don’t wear your new shoes (yet)”

“Taking the right steps”

Hello group, Here’s an interesting article about the ‘right steps’ to take to become a successful group leader – check it out! “Don’t wear your new shoes (yet)”

“The 1% of Science Publishing”

Here is an astonishing article recently highlighted in Science Insider: http://news.sciencemag.org/scientific-community/2014/07/1-scientific-publishing Briefly, a new study finds that very few scientists—fewer than 1%—manage to publish a paper every year. But these 150,608 scientists dominate the research journals, having their names on 41%

“The 1% of Science Publishing”

Here is an astonishing article recently highlighted in Science Insider: http://news.sciencemag.org/scientific-community/2014/07/1-scientific-publishing Briefly, a new study finds that very few scientists—fewer than 1%—manage to publish a paper every year. But these 150,608 scientists dominate the research journals, having their names on 41%